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The cool little info from Marie Modica 

Possession and wearing of tartan was banned in Scotland after Culloden's defeat, with the promulgation of the Prohibition Act, in 1746. This ban continued in Scotland until 1782!


But during those years, law enforcement was less respected in America. This explains why Jamie allows himself to wear here his full ceremonial dress (and, in the books, an ordinary and very worn kilt for every day ...)

Speaking to Tim Downie (Governor Tryon) and David Berry (Lord John) for their Outcasts podcast, Sam Heughan pointed out how much effort it takes to film the Outlander fight scenes.

 

But when taking, he tends to growl. And that's one quirk that Caitriona Balfe won't let him get away with.
“I'm kinda teased on Outlander by Caitriona, because during the fight scenes I make a lot of noise,” he revealed. “Actually, it's necessary, it's part of the fight. It helps the other actor know when you're about to hit him. But that's a problem because you tend to go too far with it. that. And I tend to score every hit. "

'I will never forget when I left church when I first saw you. It was as if a cloudy sky was suddenly pierced with a ray of sunshine ... '
This line looks like an excerpt from volume 1 and yet ... it was written by Ronald D. Moore in the form of a nod to his wife Terry Dresbach because it refers to what he said to her when he told her made her first declaration of love!

For the costume for Claire's return to the 18th century, nothing was left to chance ...
“There are a lot of layers to this costume on purpose,” says Terry Dresbach. “The original layer is a short coat and a cape. She doesn't take off all the layers until she and Jamie are back together and she's available to take back that part of herself, which had been pretty much dead for all these years. She's back with Jamie and that romantic side of herself is rekindled again. ”

“The medical box has been the subject of much research. We found references to one type of portable chest from the 18th century - a surgeon's chest. We had three tailor-made versions for the series by a specialist antique firm, Wetton and Grosch. It is one hundred percent similar to the vintage ones. The first version is the 'master', with all its details, but it is prohibitively heavy to work with as a mobile accessory, either for Caitriona or even to be carried by a horse, so we made two lighter versions. In the wooden chest are many small drawers and compartments for all the medicinal tinctures and necessary tools and instruments, from the microscope to the cutting instruments, a small mortar and pestle and a medical notebook from its former owner that the Outlander's art department created page by page. For the pirate attack, we replicated the small glass bottles with glass sugar so they can be safely thrown away. '


Stuart Bryce, in charge of the sets

In the series, one would easily take Fergus and Marsali for two young people of almost the same age ...
... in the books, we know that he was born in 1735 and she, in 1751. In fact, when you think about it, Laoghaire was not married at the end of season 2 and she had not yet had a child.
So Marsali was not even born when Fergus took part in the Battle of Prestonpans!

Several costumes in the series are embellished with an 'easter egg' (little surprise for insiders).
For example, on this dress, you will notice in the middle of the plant motifs ... a small embroidered strawberry that recalls the origin of the last name of Claire and Jamie!

'With the title' A Good Man '(episode 13 of season 4), I looked at it and I thought to myself: 'I wonder who they are talking about'. Then I got into the script and was blown away. I knew this point in Ian's story was approaching, since I had read the books, but to see it on the page and then sit down at this table [note: the table where the cast and crew do joint reading of scripts before shoots], reading and saying these words out loud for the first time with everyone ... I got chills in my spine. It was the recognition I was looking for. I'm super proud of it and of what the team has created; I thought it was magic. '

(John Bell, on the Season 4 finale)

In the last episode of season 2, it took barely a few seconds, in the heat of the moment, to convince us that Jamie cannot pass the stones ...
... but that Brianna AND Roger, yes!

Jon Gary Steele, production designer of the series since its inception, said that he placed a copy of the Drums of Autumn (volume 4 - equivalent of the future season 4) on the back shelf, between Jamie and Claire on this image...
... a hidden way to promise that they will get back together and have lots of adventures!

For the scene where the young Indian girl kills herself joining the man she loves, there really were two professional stuntmen who were employed to play the two people who perish at the stake ...
They could only afford to do it once, because it's two people who are on fire and it is very expensive. The stunt liner tripped on the way up and bumped into the other liner but still managed to get into the correct position. Unfortunately, the straw she was breathing through melted. The fire department extinguished after 15 seconds ... and that's when she realized she had second degree burns on her lips!

Because it is always good to locate oneself geographically ... and that will be important in season 6 because some new secondary characters will be from the Lowlands.
This is how these two large areas are located in Scotland

"I was terrified when I approached this season about French fashion, 'admitted Heughan in an interview with FN. 'I was worried about the frills and lacy things.'
But he was relieved to wear some remarkable boots that were worn at the time, although they were rarely seen in period series.
'Jamie doesn't have to wear shoes - he wears amazing boots,' he added. 'They're awful to put on because they have 18 buckles, but they throw some, to be honest.'

Click - Spoil V. 8

The clothes Claire wears on the day she enters medical school: a nice wink from the costume designer who says a lot about Claire's state of mind when she regains part of her independence, she wears a garment with a Scottish motif.

In Roger’s Scottish song The false Bride, better known internationally under the title of I once loved a lass, there is this not insignificant little passage: 'How many strawberries grow round the salt sea'. This question that we could translate by 'How many strawberries grow around the salt sea?'. A priori no one can explain this passage, but there is a theory that the strawberries of the song refer to the Fraser clan which we know that the ancient origin would be French and that they called themselves 'the people of the strawberry' ... The choice of this song proves first of all how well Roger knows his classics. And then it is a nod to what Roger will say one day to Brianna in book 5 'The Cross of Fire': when he sings, he always sings for her. In the montage of the scene we see, moreover, the gaze of young people meet at this moment.

ORPHANS and their ADOPTION. 

 

A theme extremely present in the work of Diana Gabaldon

 

The two main heroes are orphans themselves.
Claire lost her parents at the age of 5 and was raised by her uncle whom she already lost at the beginning of the story, Jamie lost her mom at 8 and her dad at 19, following what he wandered for years before finding a bond that will be the most important of his life ...

 

Brianna was raised by a loving stepfather and lost him before knowing her real father.

Roger lost his parents when he was very young and was raised by his uncle whom he lost as a young man. After living with Jamie and Claire, he considers his parents.

 

Fergus was an orphan and lived in a brothel when Jamie picked him up. Later his name will be officially announced to him when he gets married.

 

Marsali and Joanie lost their father, but Jamie took them under the wing by marrying Laoghaire.
Young Ian was taken from his family by pirates and was later adopted by an Indian tribe on condition that he renounce everything that was part of his natural roots ...

 

William lost his mother (mother Geneva) and (he believes) his father at birth. He was taken in by his aunt (mom Isobel) and by Lord John whom he considers to be his father even if he was not adopted at birth. He then lost his mother as a teenager ... and he discovers the truth about his father (who is indeed alive) when he is only a very young man.

- Without Claire, Jamie found herself adrift: no longer the will to live, prison, bondage and then relearning to live but without her. Edinburgh ... he prints pamphlets, smuggles alcohol, usually lives in a brothel. All in all it is as if he was chasing after the life of outlaw he had known before meeting Claire.
- Without Jamie, Claire was able to escape the depression of the bourgeois stay-at-home mother well enough but, nevertheless, she got gentrified in those United States of the 50s and 60s. The comfort of a certain financial security, his beautiful house, his network of friends and his work.
When they are reunited, Jamie seems to have changed too much while she has become timid. Their stars seem to have left their alignment. But Jamie still wants to believe it. They will still have to overcome many obstacles, but they will be together and they WILL FINALLY be able to found their own home.
This is what makes Fraser's Ridge exceptional at the scale of their lives.

When Jamie accompanied Claire to Craigh Na Dun for the first time, he gave her her tartan because she had her top all torn after the trial. He urges her to leave and goes down the hill. Finally when she joins him, we see her carrying the tartan on her shoulders and she approaches him, lying down and ... necessarily without cover!

Marie's information comes as much from her personal reflections as from finds unearthed on the Internet during her countless research. 

Diana Gabaldon does a lot of research to place the adventures of her heroes in the historical context ...


This is how she was largely inspired by the true story of a survivor of the battle of Culloden who returned to his land and hid for 7 years in a cave. The locals referred to him as Bonaid Odhair, the Dun Bonnet (Gray Bonnet) to avoid attracting the attention of the English. His real name was James Fraser of Foyers, near Loch Ness.


She was also inspired by another detail of this story: one day, the young boy who brought the Dun Bonnet a supply barrel was surprised by the English. The barrel fell in a place dubbed 'Leap o' the cask ', the barrel jump. And as the soldiers wanted to make him confess where the hiding place was and that he refused to betray his master, his hand was cut off ...

Some time ago, interviewed by BBC Scotland about her visit to the battlefield of Culloden, Diana Gabaldon replied: 'I could hear them.'


That's all she could say, she was still so moved.

memory of the beginnings ...


'We were in the stables and I remember you walked in and we had no idea what we were getting into. And I think we were both a little shy and nervous and we had no idea, and that was just - she's going to be my wife for the next 5-6 years. '
Sam Heughan to Caitriona Balfe  

Tobias Menzies and Caitriona Balfe wrote love letters to each other as their characters before acting out the sex scenes.
These letters made them feel less uncomfortable when it came time to act out these scenes in front of the entire technical team of the series.

The fashion for male wigs evolved during the 18th century. On this montage you can see different specimens. The two that stand out from the crowd are worn by figures we meet in the 1740s who are already old (they were starting to dress old-fashioned). All the others correspond to the style that will flourish until the end of the golden age of wigs, towards the end of the 18th century ...
Why were the wigs white?
Because they were powdered to maintain good hygiene.


But why wigs ?!
Because it was shameful for a man to present a bald head since it was one of the known symptoms of syphilis ... shameful disease if there was one!
It is to Louis XIV that we owe the generalization of this fashion: the Sun King having suffered in his youth from a disease which made him lose hair from the age of 17, he systematically wore a wig in public and, as he was the greatest 'influencer' of his time ...
[For the record in the big - when Louis XIV died, the news toured the courts of Europe. In Prussia, the sovereign Frederick William I received a letter and turned to his entourage saying this: 'Gentlemen, the King is dead!']

'Recently I was in a fitting session and as I was putting on the boots I was like,' Oh my God. I had forgotten how heavy his clothes are, how big his personality is. ' It will be good to come back and be him again. He is so strong. You feel very proud and like it is an honor to perform it. '
(interview with Sam Heughan for Parade Magazine)
photo montage made by Hanca Forch  

Claire's wedding dress took four months to make and weighed 15 kg.

The Outlander production adapted / modified several key moments from the episode 'First Wife' (season 3) such as when Jenny and Ian forced Jamie to punish young Ian for running away from Lallybroch. In the book, Jenny and Ian force Jamie to beat young Ian with his belt to teach the prodigal son and his uncle a lesson, but once he's done, Jamie surprisingly forces young Ian to himself. do the same thing. However, in the episode, Jamie convinced Jenny and Ian to force their son to do dreadful chores on the farm, without using the belt against him or beating him at all.


'We explored a first draft of it where exactly what happens in the book happens in the script,' explained Toni Graphia. 'But we were all marked by the fact that we made it a point of Claire teaching Jamie that beating someone isn't always the answer and is not the right thing to do to someone you love. , even if it happened to you as a child [see episode 9 of season 1 'A good correction']. Jamie agreed to never hit her again, so we wondered why wouldn't that apply to a child or teenager? '


In fact, showing that Jamie took this lesson to heart had a very meaningful purpose. 'Choosing not to hit someone shows growth in them. This is one of the ways it was changed by Claire, 'says Graphia. 'He comes up with a different method, a really nasty chore and, in fact, it's almost worse for young Ian because he's been forced to do something that only young children are instructed to do. We researched the worst thing kids had to do at the time, and that was making dung patties. So if he wanted to act like a child, he had to do child labor. '

Take this moment 'to emphasize how much Claire's presence influenced Jamie and her attitude' was important to writers. 'Plus Jamie received a lot of punches, he deserved a break,' Graphia added with a laugh.
.
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source: https: //www.hollywoodreporter.com /.../ outlander-first ... 

Le décor de la maison de Claire et de Frank à Boston (saison 3) a été monté à partir de l'appartement de Claire et de Jamie à Paris (saison 2)
... tout un symbole!

In the episodes, whenever you see food being served at the table, it's real ...

To create the most authentic atmosphere possible, the technical team does not use fluorescent lights and no LED bulbs ...

In Season 2, 12 of each of Claire's major 18th-century costumes were made, just in case ...

It was during a conversation between friends that Maril Davis (future producer of the series) and Terry Dresbach (future costume designer) gave the idea to Ronald D. Moore (husband of Terry D. and future producer) to make an adaptation of Diana Gabaldon's books.
So he wrote the script for a pilot episode and contacted the author to make her a proposal. Diana G. was immediately won over by what was presented to her and asked Ronald D. Moore to personally take charge of the adaptation of her story.
Here is his explanation: 'I said to him, 'This is the first thing I have ever read based on my work that did not make me turn pale or catch fire.'

In costume, on the set of season 1, when they both participated in the Gathering episode.

About Claire's outfits in season 4 ...
'There are a lot of layers, but the silhouette is [a] very 1940s-1950s men's style shirt, belted. It's Elizabeth Taylor in Giant. It's Katharine Hepburn in just about anything. It's Greta Garbo. We still keep that triangular shape, the tight waist and the marked shoulders of a 1940s woman. '


Terry dresbach

When Rupert is injured, Angus calls out to Claire, saying: 'Rupert, he needs you, mistress ... now!'
When he finally collapses, we can barely make out the last few words he says: 'Save me, mistress!'
This is where we see how much he trusted her ...

The figurehead of Artemis is none other than the ornamental figure that we could have seen in the Parisian brothel of season 2!

Sam Heughan reads the books as the seasons go by, but he's also in touch with Diana Gabaldon to discuss Jamie's thoughts and motivations in certain situations, giving him a head start in his career. interpretation.
For example, in that terrible scene where Jamie struggles with his feelings. We see him lift his eyes for a moment like an imploration to the sky. He hopes not to be affected by BJR's gestures but, very quickly, his expression testifies to his dismay when he feels that his body is betraying him. 


These moments quite illustrate a finding he would share years later to comfort young Ian ... in Season 4: 


'Your cock has no conscience, but you do.' 

About Jamie's vest ...
'We added layers and layers of covers on it,' Nina Ayres told Elle after tweaking the costume to make it properly worn. 'It takes weeks,' added Terry Dresbach. It is sewn by hand. We deliberately tore the fabric and then stitched it back together to make it look like it had been mended and mended and mended. '
Terry Dresbach, Outlander's costume manager for seasons 1 to 4. Nina Ayres was his assistant at the time.

At the end of season 4, Claire and Jamie meet their grandson. We see Claire take him in her arms, then she passes him to Jocasta.
Fans wondered, 'But, damn it, why isn't Claire giving it to Jamie ?!' - especially when you think of Faith, Brianna and Willie that he couldn't carry!
Yet it was planned in the script: Jamie had to take the baby in his arms. But the baby would scream all the time when he got into Sam's arms. So they had to give up on that scene ...
... that's why they wanted to catch up on one of the very first official photos of season 5!

 

Can I see her ? Nah, the grannies first!

If you scan the horizon carefully, you might see the Americas, it's the only place where you haven't sung that damn song!
... and the loop comes full circle!

This is what Jamie replied in Gaelic to William:


- 'Do you really have to go, Mac?'
- 'Na bith còin, a bhalaich. Bithidh e glè cheart. (Don't cry, my dear. Everything will be fine.) '

Diana Gabaldon was quickly delighted with the choice of Sam, but she was no less satisfied with the choice of Cait ...


Hard to believe that lightning can strike twice, but it sure is. As Caitriona Balfe appeared onscreen, I straightened up and said, 'There she is!' She and Sam Heughan absolutely lit the screen with fireworks.

These actors who played in season 4 are of Canadian nationality and made the trip to Scotland to represent the Indians of the forests, their ancestors ...

It is the same part on the three photos

In the books, Claire does not smoke ...

As you might expect: Jamie's signet ring is adorned with a deer, the emblem of his family. [EDIT: precisely, the emblem of the Frasers of Lovat]


And if the image is reversed, it is done on purpose since he uses this seal to seal his letters ... when he is not tampering with other people's letters!

In Diana Gabaldon's version, Jamie didn't know what Laoghaire had done to Claire ...


'The dirty little bitch!' he said, in a tone more astonished than anything else. 'No, I didn't know that at all - Lord, Sassenach, you can't think I would have married this woman knowing that she had done such a thing to you!'
(The Cross of Fire - volume 5)

Claire's arrival took place on the Royal Mile, a famous street in Edinburgh. But it's a big, major street. We can't stop him for the shoot. In addition, there is too much modernity.  

So this whole scene was basically shot in a parking lot behind the studio, in a green screen hallway. We rebuilt the Royal Mile around them and laid out a section of cobbled street about twenty-five yards long and did all the scenes in that [area]. With the visual effects, we enlarged it and installed the buildings on either side, which was a 3D process. We built them in 3-D from site surveys and extensive photographs of the real place and ended up using a virtual camera system.  

By the time we filmed we had a rough version of our model, so from the screen while we were filming we could frame and see which buildings would be on our map and how to frame them in relation to them. '
Excerpt from The Making of Outlander: The Series Seasons 3 & 4
by Tara Bennett 

(Here's the official description of Fergus' character for Season 3, according to Starz) 


'Born in a brothel, Fergus grew to be a charming and devilishly handsome man with a strong sense of loyalty and decorum, despite his unconventional upbringing. He is the ultimate romantic, with a heart on his hand and easily falling in love. However, Fergus's devotion to Jamie never wavered, making the French an integral part of the Fraser clan. Yet his easygoing demeanor masks a longing for lasting love and a lasting sense of belonging. ' 

Makeup artist and hairstylist Anne McEwan said: 


“The trip was planned in the sequence of the story, so we had the luxury of growing Richard's beard naturally - his beard grows quickly, so it was effective. A wig was used to lengthen his hair, and in later steps, a weft was added to lengthen the wig.  

 

The bruises, blows from time, and broken bones were a mix of makeup and physical play for Richard. When he was beaten by Jamie, a one eye was swollen with a piece of silicone and the other swollen with a smaller piece of scar silicone. Five in all were applied to her face and smeared with makeup and blood. At the start of the Mohawk trip, we used lenses that had been custom made and painted to look bloodshot, added redness and bruising to his face and eyes, and painted his wrists raw. - course, we have added a rough paint makeup crust on hands and wrists to show rope cuts and friction burns. Smaller swelling was used on the eye and the same cuts were used, but glued closed, to show some healing. Streaks of weather and dirt increased, her lips were dry and chapped with a specific product, and her eyes were reddened and darkened to show extreme fatigue. The scar above the forehead - that will be a scar that will remain in the future. " 


(Season 4 Ep 10) 

Diana Gabaldon has developed characters in her saga that she had not foreseen and that she nicknamed "mushrooms".
This is what she says about it:
“I have no idea where they came from; they appear out of nowhere and walk away with whatever scene they find themselves in.
Lord John [the English soldier] came out of nowhere to try to cut Jamie's throat. I was thinking, who are you ?! ”
Among the other mushrooms, we also find Geillis Duncan, Master Raymond and Fergus 

This is what volume 6 of the saga looks like on the table of Matthew B. Roberts, the producer of the series ...
... photo taken and shared by himself to show how hard they had worked on "A Whirlwind of Snow and Ash" to prepare for the new season. 

The famous explanation everyone would like to have about the ghost of Inverness ...
... Diana Gabaldon has planned to finish her book 10 by revealing the truth: "This will be the last thing of the last book."
Asked if she thinks fans will be excited about this, she continued:
"Oh, I think so. I expect to leave them in streams of tears, but still happy."

During the filming of season 1 and for obvious technical reasons (the use of the sets and surroundings of Leoch Castle - in reality Doune Castle), the crews filmed first episodes 1 to 6 then episodes 9 and 10.
Then, they went back a little in history to shoot episodes 7 and 8. And finally, they chained the last episodes 11 to 16. So therefore, they shot the episode of reconciliation before that of marriage. !

On the issue of laced sleeves ...
Working-class women of this period had laces going in and out of the sleeves at the armpits. This allowed the carrier to have freedom of movement but it was also a way to distinguish the working class and the upper layer.
In the Outlander series, Claire represents both classes. When found, she is dressed in peasant-style clothing, which gives her freedom of movement to wash clothes and perform her duties as a healer. But when she and Jamie moved to France, the dress style changed to accommodate their new status. While she still acted as a healer and needed unrestricted movement ... but, in Paris, style became more important than function.

The fights with fists (even false) are exhausting on the set.


Asked about Roger's altercations with Jamie in season four, Richard Rankin said, “It was very tiring for both of us, I think more than we thought. Take after take these clashes were pretty exhausting, but great fun at the same time. "


At the end of season 4, a 'Questions and Answers' session with Richard Rankin was organized by Starz on Twitter. A fan then asked if Sam H. accidentally hit her in the face while filming the first scene between Jamie and Roger.
Here is Richard R.'s response: "There could have been some slight lost blows but Sam is a pro, it went pretty well."
And the remark of Sam H. in the wake: "Obviously I did not try hard enough

Now that Diana Gabaldon has finished volume 9, she will be able to tackle other stories!
She has announced that her next two biggest projects are Volume 10 and the infamous "prequel" book about Jamie's parents that she has already started writing - both ... as well as a number of other manuscripts.
She said she didn't know which of the two would come out first as it will depend on her inspiration ...
... but we already know that the story of the youth of Jamie Fraser's parents will give a good place to the character of Murtagh, Brian Dubh's best friend

“For us, it's all about the details. Whether or not you go see it all on camera or not - maybe you will, maybe you won't, but whatever - the actor knows. it's there, we know it's there, it's done right. " 

  

Terry dresbach 

Small testimony from Diana Gabaldon on the set of episode 11 of season 2:
"You wouldn't believe how difficult it was to choreograph this final scene in the kitchen! It took us two days to figure it out, plus an afternoon in the stunt room watching Sam throw the guy playing Danton towards the walls in different directions. Apparently my most useful contribution (according to Caitriona) was telling the director he had too many knives in it. the scene.I
don't remember if Sam ended up throwing him in the final version - definitely pushed / punched across the room, but they really insisted that Mary had to actually stab him, to get agency / revenge / justice.


And then of course the Duke of Sandringham ... it was a lot of fun. After convincing them that you really can't cut off a man's head cleanly all at once with a broadsword, and suggested an ax and multiple hash (of course, Murtagh beheads the Duke off the page in the book, so no conflicts with the practicalities), we had to figure out how to get Murtagh into the scene discreetly _and_ let him pick up an ax somewhere. _Then_ how to move the Duke so that he comes more or less in front of Murtagh, but doesn't see him until the last minute. It took two days to shoot - after the previous two days of trying to put the scene on paper and cut it into shots.
The props had made a nice decapitated head - which looked so much like Simon it was striking - and we had _a_ rehearsal (with a voice actor) to make sure the blood bomb would work. This had to happen (providing a convincing Type-O shower) precisely in time with the momentum of the (rubber) ax. So the stuntman was dressed in a HazMat suit (with helmet) and stood on a big chunk of thick plastic, and everyone was crowding across the kitchen (it was a real kitchen - in Callendar House - no decor at all) and EVERYBODY held their breath, because if it didn't work ...! But ... BAM! and the blood went everywhere, total success! And the filming of the actual scene (which didn't involve Simon; I think it was


Anyway - to begin with, Jamie arrives with a sword _and_ a dagger, then throws them to the ground at the Duke's request, and originally Mary was supposed to grab the dagger on the ground, run through the coin and stab Danton with it. ; previously Caitriona and Simon did their thing with a carving knife and Murtagh was sneaking through the back door with an ax. So it turned out that Jamie didn't come in with knives and Mary effectively grabbed the carving knife that Claire and the Duke had lost track of, and in the end everything went pretty well. "

Small testimony from Diana Gabaldon 
<< I remember asking Sam Heughan, shortly after he was chosen, if he could tell me how he had prepared for his audition (which I had just seen and I had been amazed). He said, "I just have a hunch for the guy." >>
In illustration, two scenes which would not have been the same without this famous intuition:
- wearing the redcoats uniform, an idea of ​​Sam Heughan and for which he fought in order to bring out on the screen to how Jamie feels out of place on Governor Tryon's side.
- eat the sandwich with a knife and a fork, a total improvisation that brings out all the more the quirky side of this meal in the 18th century and the humor of Jamie who tastes little of the peanut butter and jam sandwich. ..

Diana Gabaldon does a lot of research to place the adventures of her heroes in the historical context ...
This is how she was largely inspired by the true story of a survivor of the Battle of Culloden who returned to his land and hid for 7 years in a cave. The locals referred to him as * Bonaid Odhair, * the Dun Bonnet (Gray Bonnet) to avoid attracting the attention of the English. His real name was James Fraser of Foyers, near Loch Ness.
She was also inspired by another detail of this story: one day, the young boy who brought the Dun Bonnet a supply barrel was surprised by the English. The barrel fell in a place nicknamed "Leap o 'the cask", the barrel jump. And since the soldiers wanted to make him confess where the hiding place was and he refused to betray his master, his hand was cut off ...

If you click on the following link, you will see a video that shows how to access the James Fraser cave of Foyers which is very difficult to find:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xdWeObW7Vk  

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

Actor David Berry himself has raised the possibility of a Lord John spinoff in 2020, admitting he would be up for it.
“I think the character is a great character,” he told Digital Spy and other media. "I really enjoy these novels. It's kind of in the realm of guesswork, so in a hypothetical world, yeah, I would jump at the chance to play the character again on the right show."
"The source material is really strong. Diana wrote a wonderful character and a wonderful series of books, and I really enjoyed playing with him."

 

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

excerpt from an interview with Sam Heughan by the NYT, dating from February 2021
How is it to turn with the new rules of hygiene?
“It's not so much the protocols that are difficult - you have to wear a mask, you have to socially distance yourself where you can - it's more the psychology of those. Certainly when you start a job, everything the world is very tense, very conscious. Of course the protocols are there for your own good, but everyone has a hard time feeling repressed or not being themselves, or going against their own instincts as a human being. When you see someone you haven't seen in a while you want to hug or touch them or get close to them. You have to go against your instincts acting on set, where you're supposed to use your instincts to portray a character, so it's a really weird situation, but weget used to it. "

What happened to Laoghaire after the Jacobite uprising?
Laoghaire had married Hugh MacKenzie and had two children with him, Marsali and Joan, but her husband was killed at the Battle of Culloden. She remarried Simon MacKimmie who was the owner of the small estate in Balriggan where she settled with her children. He was arrested a few years after the Jacobite uprising and died in prison.
She then married Jamie Fraser who came to live in Balriggan where he took care of the estate and his little family, but their couple quickly fell apart and he preferred to leave. He settled in Edinburgh where, thanks to his new, more or less illicit activities, he was earning enough money for himself and to provide for his household even if he no longer set foot there and n had nothing more to do with the one who nevertheless remained his wife.
Thus, Laoghaire was in Balriggan (not so far from Lallybroch) the day she received news of Claire's return (season 3) and it was in this same house that she later welcomed Brianna (season 4). ..

 

We learned in the middle of August (2021) that Caitriona Balfe had given birth to a baby boy. But, in truth, the event happened long before. As the recent message of Colin McFarlane (the interpreter of Ulysses) testifies it "Finally the secret is revealed! ..."
According to what is said now on the right and on the left, the actress would have had her baby little after the wrap of season 6 - which would therefore be no stranger to the fact that they shortened the filming ... We will be able to have fun detecting the signs of her pregnancy during her various scenes of the coming season .

There are many theories circulating about the ghost of Inverness ...
What do you think of this one (found in an English speaking group)?
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“Jamie would have died the day Claire arrived in the 18th century. That's why we saw his ghost at the same age he was at the time, same hairstyle, same outfit. He died because he couldn't defend himself with his shoulder dislocated.
When Claire and Frank arrived in Scotland on the day that ghosts are free to roam the Earth, Jamie's ghost came to find this beautiful, attentive and competent caregiver of soldiers (including Scottish). He called her back to the past, at a time before her death so that she could put her shoulder back on him.
This is why they have such an unbreakable bond, because if Claire hadn't been called / drawn to her time, Jamie would have died fighting the Redcoats they encountered soon after.
It also explains why he was so amazed when he saw her after he passed out and fell off the horse, after his gunshot wound. In his dazed state, he returned to the first moment his ghost saw her in the 20th century (he doesn't know he saw her when he was a ghost) perhaps having the feeling that this beautiful lady he dreamed of or had a vision of before, is actually here with him. Jamie lives because Claire healed him so they are "united for life". >>
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We know that Diana Gabaldon gave her secret to Ronald D. Moore (who wrote the script for the first episode) and to Sam Heughan and, as luck would have it, the production parallels Claire's two interventions to heal Jamie. ...

He's a real boar that was used to film the footage with Jamie in season 5.
As he posed a potential threat to anyone who approached him, Sam Heughan was not allowed to shoot the scene near the animal and he was replaced by a stuntman. And when the boar got a certain distance while charging, Jamie's voice actor was able to jump into the back of a van ...

Outlander's account hardly dwells on the participation of the Irish in the various Jacobite uprisings. Ireland, however, also paid a high price for participating in battles long before those of Prestonpans and Culloden, when the Jacobites supported the Stuart dynasty, not in the person of Bonnie Prince Charlie. but of his father, the Old Pretender ...
... the producers of the series paid them here a discreet homage by hanging on the wall behind our heroes one of the Jacobite banners which is none other than the traditional flag of Ireland!

At the time of the Jacobite rebellion of 1745, the English saw very disparaging pamphlets circulating in the streets about the Highlanders, who were systematically regarded as backward.
Here is an example, dating from June 1745. We see a man named Sawney (and there, we necessarily think of JAMMF!) Not knowing how to use public toilets ...
"Sawney in the bog"